We’re now going to broadcast Christian music (1 cd per week) over the telephone system’s speakers, and we’ll no longer be playing out personal radios in our offices. This is a Human Resources company, with absolutely no religious affiliations whatsoever. Is it legal for my employer to force the whole staff to listen Dove Award winning Christian R&B for 37.5 hours per week here in the USA?
It will play over the telephones so that it can be heard in the office when that phone isn’t being used.
Even though we’re an HR company, we fired the last person with an actual HR degree because she kept telling the owners what they could, and could not do. So, NO, we have nobody left who knows the actual HR laws we’re supposed to be experts in.

why does christian music give me anxiety?

i have a mom who enjoys turning on christian music on the speaker in our entertainment center and u can hear it through the house. its not slow hymns (which are depressiong), but they are instead this christian rock thing that is very repetitive and it feels like im about to have a panic attack whenever its on , its not out of fear of god or guilt that im anxious, its just that this particular music makes me anxious.

We’re now going to broadcast Christian music (1 cd per week) over the telephone system’s speakers, and we’ll no longer be playing out personal radios in our offices. This is a Human Resources company, with absolutely no religious affiliations whatsoever. Is it legal for my employer to force the whole staff to listen Dove Award winning Christian R&B for 37.5 hours per week here in the USA?

When you think of weddings and imagine the list of songs that a bride and groom will choose, you would naturally picture out heartfelt, romantic love songs with all the mushy description of love. Commonly these are the kind songs couples would tend to choose to be played at on their wedding.

But have you ever thought about using a Christian wedding song with an upbeat melody? I have actually attended a wedding event wherein the bride and the groom chose a unique song line up. Instead of choosing the usual sentimental love songs, I was amazed and impressed when they opted to use Christian rock wedding music on their wedding reception.

Yes, you heard it right. They actually chose a wedding music with a rock genre. Contrary to the assumption that guests would not appreciate the song line-up, surprisingly everyone loved it and enjoyed it even the oldies. It is not even offensive because if you listen to the lyrics of the song, it actually is a Christian song, only it comes with an upbeat melody.

These days, modern couples are getting more and more open to suggestions and are eager to try out unique ways to make their special event really memorable and fun. Although most couples would still opt to choose the sentimental music, it is not a bad idea at all to suggest a different kind of song genre. Of course, you will need to consider the location where the song should be played. For instance, though the song is Christian by nature, I believe it’s not appropriate to be played during the wedding ceremony considering it is a solemn event. However, you can always play it during the wedding reception where everyone will surely enjoy.

So to all couples planning to get married, you might want to consider playing a Christian wedding song with a rock genre. Trust me, it’s very worth it.

 

Make your wedding an experience to remember. Visit http://www.christianweddingsongs.net/ for more christian wedding rock songs that you can use on the most memorable event of your life.

Music! It Makes Christian Recovery Rock

Music! It makes Christian recovery rock. In California, this last year or so, it was Santos entertaining attentive Christian audiences with his doo wap singing. In Hawaii, it’s been Darrell Mansfield with his steaming harmonica and talented Christian combos.

I remember how well our early history conferences went in Marin County, California when they were accompanied by speaker dances, and my sponsees as DJ’s.

Today, you seldom enter a church without seeing a stage full of music stands, mikes, drum sets, and performance-ready musical setups.

Recovery for an eager Christian or Christian-to-be starts with God and coming to Him through His Son Jesus Christ. It certainly stands firm as a rock when grounded on the Bible.

And once a suffering soul has turned to these resources to overcome addiction, guilt, shame, despair, fear, anger, and ill-health, it’s time to rejoice, be thankful, be merry because of the deliverance.

“Is any among you afflicted? let him pray. Is any merry? let him sing psalms” (James 5:13). “A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance. . .” (Proverbs 15:13). And then there’s Bill Wilson’s old saw–“We are not a glum lot.”

I would amend that by saying that most of us are glum as we move forward into sobriety and healing. But we are lifted by the mirth and music and laughter of others, and long to be a part of the merry crowd. Hail to our singing friends who believe in the Lord and sing his praises. They sure make my almost 24 years of sobriety a joy and pleasure.

I can still hear the audience in Escondido, singing “Shout” as Santos urged them on. And I can see the audience stomping as Darrell Mansfield sang out “Stand by me” whilst we enjoyed the “blues cruise.”

Writer, Historian, Retired attorney, Bible student, CDAAC, and an active and recovered A.A. member. Author of 39 published titles and over 300 articles on A.A. history and recovery

leaving Miami, FL, stopping in Key West, FL and Calica, Mexico